Greenway Designates Two Croton Trails
Village of Croton-on-Hudson E-Notice
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Greenway Designates Two Croton Trails
4/2/2010 12:04:41 PM
The Hudson River Valley Greenway, is pleased to announce the designation of the Croton Riverwalk and the Croton Gorge Trail, both in the Village of Croton-on-Hudson, Westchester County, as part of the Greenway Trails system.

(Albany, NY) Mark Castiglione, Acting Executive Director of the Hudson River Valley Greenway, is pleased to announce the designation of the Croton Riverwalk and the Croton Gorge Trail, both in the Village of Croton-on-Hudson, Westchester County, as part of the Greenway Trails system. The trails were designated at the Hudson River Valley Greenway Board Meeting on March 26, 2010. The Riverwalk trail segment is 3 miles, and the Croton Gorge Trail is 0.5 mile, adding an additional 3.5 miles of trail to the Hudson River Valley Greenway Trail System. The newest portion of the Riverwalk Trail links to an already designated 2 mile portion, creating a longer trail right along the riverfront in Croton-on-Hudson, and extending the Greenway’s vision of a continuous riverside trail. The Greenway Trail includes over 314 miles of designated riverfront trails and Connectors/Countryside Corridors through the Hudson Valley.

“The Greenway is so pleased to add these trail segments to our trail system,” Castiglione stated. “Communities like Croton-on-Hudson are helping us to achieve the vision of a continuous riverside trail that will be a regional resource for residents and visitors alike. Community trails are important for many reasons; they help to drive the economy, increase the quality of life, and connect natural and cultural resources throughout the Valley.”

Leo A. W. Wiegman, Mayor of Croton-on-Hudson, said, “Croton has become a great destination for day hikers due to our excellent trail system, two publicly accessible rivers, and the super train service to and from the city. We are very grateful for the long term efforts of our volunteers, especially Jan Wines, who chairs our Trails Committee. We're thrilled that the Greenway has honored us by designating our trail segments as important connections to the Valley's trail system."

Jan Wines, Chair of the Croton Trails Committee, said, “The Croton Trails Committee is delighted that key sections of the village’s trail system have been designated as part of the Hudson Valley Greenway System. The designation of almost four miles of scenic trails along the Hudson and Croton Rivers fulfills an important goal called for in our Trail Master Plan developed almost eighteen years ago. These designated sections of trails not only are beautiful in their own right, but they also provide connections to a wooded trail system that traverses the Village of Croton-on-Hudson. We wish to thank the Greenway Conservancy for its designation, and look forward to working closely with them in the future so we may continue to enhance the trail system for the benefit of all.”

Designation by the Greenway is a formal recognition of the regional significance of the trail as a destination for experiencing the natural, scenic, cultural and historic resources of the Hudson River Valley.~ The Greenway places a priority in its Conservancy grant program for the development and enhancement of designated trails.~ Designation recognizes that the trail is an important link in the Greenway Trail System, which will run along both sides of the Hudson River from the Capital Region to Manhattan.

The Greenway Conservancy for the Hudson River Valley is a public benefit corporation established by the Greenway Act of 1991 to continue New York State’s commitment to the preservation, enhancement and development of the world-renowned scenic, natural, historic, cultural and recreational resources of the Hudson River Valley, while continuing to emphasize appropriate economic development activities and remaining consistent with the tradition of municipal home rule. One of the Conservancy’s primary objectives is to establish a Hudson River Valley Greenway Trail System that links cultural and historic sites, parks, open spaces and community centers, and provides public access to the Hudson River.

Mark Castiglione